Stereoscopic Imaging

251-0230-00

Spring/Summer 2005

 

 

Stereoscopic Imaging has captivated the public since 1851. It is a wonderful visual illusion in which each eye sees a slightly different image. Our brain is tricked into believing that small lateral shifts in the position of objects implies a difference in the distance to that object. Even though we know that the images we perceive are unreal, we find them to be fascinating.

The focus of this course is to understand human perception and thus to understand the mechanisms of the stereoscopic illusion. The course covers stereoscopic imaging from five different perspectives: visual intelligence, digital imaging, human vision, film craft, and traditonal stereoscope. The course is somewhat non-traditional in the sense that you will learn by creating stereoscopic systems and images. You will create a short stereoscopic film (working in small teams) which will enable you to integrate the material you've learned in the lectures and to use it to create films. We also cover a number of interesting and related areas: the technology of television with particular focus on digital video, image coding, color perception and reproduction.

 

What's new and different______________________________________

What's new? -- New lectures! New projects! New and better equipment!

This year's lectures will take a different approach to the course material. Rather than treating Stereoscopic Imaging from five distinct perspectives, this year's lectures will integrate this material around a variety of themes and related questions: What are the limits of visual acuity? How is color perceived and processed? When is Now? We believe this will improve the integration of material and will provide a more comprehensive understanding of these topics. As such, the lectures have been re-designed and the slides will be posted each week after the lecture.

In general, the primary focus of this course is deeply tied to human perception. Stereoscopic imaging is a wonderful illusion. As such it requires that we understand this illusion. But to understand illusions one must first understand how we perceive the world. Illusions are interesting because they reveal those areas where our perception is not entirely consistent with reality. Perception is also fundamental to computer graphics, printing, imaging, human computer interface design and the development of man-machine interfaces. Perception includes all of our sensory modalities, not merely vision. In this course we will focus primarily on vision but will also include as many of the others as is possible.

We have also moved all of the material related to film making to the recitation sections. This will enable us to cover this material in more depth and will give us time to watch and study films. We will link film related material into theTuesday lectures, but these will serve to augment the lectures rather than be a primary focus of them.

We've also re-designed the projects for the course to provide a broader perspective and enhanced opportunities. We think you'll enjoy the new projects.

Last year we ended the semester by organizing a Student Film Festival that was held on July 1, 2004 with repeat performances on July 7th. An article about the films and course was published in ETH Life. A web version (and print version) are available from ETH Life or via the links on this page. We will do something similar this year.

One of the student projects from last year has been entered in a Film Festival Competition. We hope to provide similar opportunities for this year's student films.

Lecture__________________________________________

Tuesday         13:15 - 15:00  IFW C 42

Thursday        11:15 - 12:00  IFW C 42 (recitation and lab session)

Lecture schedule
Projects

Faculty__________________________________________

Prof. Thomas Gross

Office hours: appointment via email (trg@inf.ethz.ch)

Dr. Cary Kornfeld

Office hours: appointment via email (ckornfel@inf.ethz.ch.)

Lecture__________________________________________

General information about the Stereoscopic Imaging lectures.

Tuesday         13:15 - 15:00 Room X-NN (tba)
Thursday        11:10 - 11:55 Room X-NN (tba)

Calendar and Script Material________________________

Tentative schedule: (expect further refinements and details)

#

Dates

Topic

Material

1

29.3.2004

Tuesday

Introduction to Stereoscopic Imaging

to be posted

2

31.3.2004

Thursday

Introduction to the lab: selection of first project

3

5.4.2004

Tuesday

Overview of Human Vision

to be posted

4

7.4.2004

Thursday

Introduction to Film Craft

5

12.4.2004

Tuesday

Stereoscopy

to be posted

6

14.4.2004

Thursday

 

7

19.4.2004

Tuesday

Visual Intelligence

to be posted

8

21.4.2004

Thursday

Second Project

9

26.4.2004

Tuesday

Convergence/Accommodation

to be posted

10

28.4.2004

Thursday

 

11

3.5.2004

Tuesday

Visual Acuity

to be posted

12

5.5.2004

Thursday

Third Project

13

10.5.2004

Tuesday

Establishing Context

to be posted

14

12.5.2004

Thursday

 

15

17.5.2004

Tuesday

Color Perception

to be posted

16

19.5.2004

Thursday

 

17

24.5.2004

Tuesday

Television

to be posted

18

26.5.2004

Thursday

Selection of 4th Project Themes/Teams

19

31.5.2004

Tuesday

Neurology and vision

to be posted

20

2.6.2004

Thursday

 

21

7.6.2004

Tuesday

When is Now?

to be posted

22

9.6.2004

Thursday

23.

14.6.2004

Tuesday

Digital Imaging and Computer Graphics

to be posted

24

16.6.2004

Thursday

25.

21.6.2004

Tuesday

Research Topics

to be posted

26

23.6.2004

Thursday

27

28.6.2004

Tuesday

To be determined

to be posted

28

30.6.2004

Thursday

Presentation of Final Projects

to be determined

Projects_________________________________________

The projects for this course are intended to provide students with practical hands on experience in the shooting, creation, editing and presentation of stereoscopic videos.

Project 1: Create a 2 minute Stereoscopic Video using the lab's facilities. This should consist of at least 4 different shots that are edited together. Project Team's of two persons.

Project 2: Modify the footage from Project 1 using a selection of different scene transitions and applying a variety of image processing techniques to the footage.

Project 3: Working in small groups, create a component (either software or hardware) to be used in a new image capture or display system. For example: add enhancements to a basic 3D video player such as the ability to play backward, to capture thumbnails, create thumbnail pointers into the video file, create a system for lighting scenes, create a rolling tripod mount for stereoscopic cameras, etc.

Project 4: Working in groups of 4-6 people, create a 5-10 minute stereoscopic "film" based on an interesting story. A storyboard MUST be created before any footage is shot. The film must have a sound track and sound effects. The film must have titles. The subject matter can vary widely from entertainment based (a story for example) to an educational production or the capture of scientifically interesting images (e.g. time lapse imagery of crystal growth, of a plant growing from seedling to flower, etc.). The project must include a variety of shots, the creation of a unifying sound track, titles and credits, and must follow generally accepted guidelines of film production.

Grading_________________________________________

Grading for the course will be based on the projects created by each student.  The first three projects will constitute 60 percent of the course grade.  The final project will constitute 40 percent of the course grade.  Individual interviews with the course instructors will be conducted at the completion of the course to discuss the final project.  In addition, the final projects will be shown to audience of interested students in the format of a film festival.  The attendees will vote on their favorite films.  These votes will be considered in the evaluation of the final project.

Our goal is to encourage students to have fun creating these video productions.  These projects enable you to practice what you've learned and to provide an opportunity for creative expression.

The instructors will be available for hands on demonstration and coaching extensively throughout the course.  Our intent is to create a course that is both enjoyable and instructive.  If you make a sincere effort in this course your grade will reflect your efforts.

Special projects can be undertaken that can provide additional credit and may enhance your grade in the course.  Alternatively, additional course credits may be given.  Students who show exceptional interest and ability are encouraged to become engaged in some of the research activities that will be conducted in association with the course.